Measured in gasoline gallon equivalents (GGEs), representing a quantity of fuel with the same amount of energy contained in a gallon of gasoline.

And overall fuel economy is expected to increase to 24 miles per gallon in 2013, another record.

The two factors affecting the average annual fuel use of a vehicle are the average miles traveled per year (correlative) and the fuel economy of the vehicle (inversely correlative). n Between 1975 and 1985, average passenger-vehicle mileage doubled from about 13.5 mpg to 27.5, while fuel economy for light trucks increased from 11.6 mpg to 19.5. n In the mid-1980s, however, Ford and general Motors lobbied the reagan administration to lower the standard. In order to make the data for previous model years comparable with model year 2017 (and future model years), the EPA also retroactively revised the corresponding data for some vehicles in model years 2011-2016. For model year 2017, the EPA revised its methodology for calculating the window-sticker fuel-economy value for new vehicles. Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy, 1949-2010: Year: Light-Duty Vehicles, Short Wheelbase 1: Light-Duty Vehicles, Long Wheelbase 2: Heavy-Duty Trucks 3: All Motor Vehicles 4: Mileage The Safer Affordable Fuel-Efficient (SAFE) Vehicles Rule, issued today by NHTSA and EPA, sets tough but feasible fuel economy and carbon dioxide standards that increase 1.5% in stringency each year from model years 2021 through 2026. That's a big step up from the 22.4 miles per gallon average for new vehicles in 2011. From the late 1980s to the mid-2000s, fuel economy generally declined while … Fuel economy rose by just 0.1 mile per gallon in 2016 and was projected in the 2017 model year to hit another record of 25.2 mpg, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said in a report. Enlarge Image For the first time in 10 years, US average fuel economy is down… To get on track with the SDS, which is aligned with the Global Fuel Economy Initiative (GFEI) 2030 targets, an annual improvement of 3.7% is needed. the early 1980s as the fuel economy law was phased in. This is called the harmonic average. Transit buses, which are relatively inefficient because of their stop-and-go drive cycles and heavy loads, consume more fuel on average than any other vehicle type. Average fuel consumption of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) improved by only 0.7% in 2017 slowing from the 2005-16 rate of 1.8% per year. Find and compare the fuel economy, fuel costs, and safety ratings of new and used cars and trucks. the early 1980s as the fuel economy law was phased in. CAFE standards set the average new vehicle fuel economy, as weighted by sales, that a manufacturer's fleet must achieve. The result of this has been a sizable year-over-year increase in average fuel economy, until now. Find and compare the fuel economy, fuel costs, and safety ratings of new and used cars and trucks. b From 1980 to 1994, Light duty vehicle, short wheel base (previously Passenger car) fuel efficiency includes motorcycles. The standards are based upon the U.S. NHTSA Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) curves, with a 1% reduction in the goal for cars and a 2% reduction for light trucks. Through the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, Congress established fuel economy standards for new passenger cars starting with model year (MY) 1978.

This chart shows the average fuel economy of vehicles in the United States, by major vehicle category. n Between 1975 and 1985, average passenger-vehicle mileage doubled from about 13.5 mpg to 27.5, while fuel economy for light trucks increased from 11.6 mpg to 19.5. n In the mid-1980s, however, Ford and general Motors lobbied the reagan administration to lower the standard. The source calculated average miles per gallon for light-duty vehicles by taking the reciprocal of the sales-weighted average of gallons per mile. That's a big step up from the 22.4 miles per gallon average for new vehicles in 2011. And overall fuel economy is expected to increase to 24 miles per gallon in 2013, another record. The average production-weighted fuel economy for all new light-duty vehicles in model year (MY) 2019 was 95% better than in MY 1975, while average horsepower was 78% higher and weight was 1% higher. In 2012, NHTSA established final passenger car and light truck CAFE standards for model years 2017-2021, which the agency projects will require in model year 2021, on average, a combined fleet-wide fuel economy of 40.3-41.0 mpg. c Assumes 55% city and 45% highway-miles. CAFE standards set the average new vehicle fuel economy, as weighted by sales, that a manufacturer's fleet must achieve. Sedan/wagons fell to 37% of the market, or less than half of the market share they held in model year 1975, even as their fuel economy increased by 0.6 mpg.