Some say you can't teach an old dog new tricks. CVTs were earlier used in industrial applications, but car manufactures such as Nissan, Audi, Ford and Honda have been using CVT technology in their cars for some time. A growing number of cars and sport utility vehicles now come with a continuously variable transmission (CVT) instead of a conventional automatic. A continuously variable transmission (CVT) is a type of automatic car transmission system that uses a pulley and belt system to provide an unlimited range of gear ratios. In 1984, the Japanese automobile manufacturer, Subaru, introduced the electronic continuously variable transmission (ECVT) in a hatchback called Subaru Justy. Direct Shift-CVT: A New Type of Continuously Variable Transmission 2.0-liter Dynamic Force Engine, a New 2.0-liter Direct-injection, Inline 4-cylinder Gasoline Engine 2.0-liter Toyota Hybrid System (THS II) New Dynamic Torque Vectoring AWD and E-Four 4WD Systems But the continuously variable transmission (CVT), which Leonardo da Vinci conceptualized more than 500 years ago and is now replacing planetary automatic transmissions in some automobiles, is one old dog that has definitely learned a few new tricks. A continuously variable transmission, or CVT, is a type of automatic transmission that provides more useable power, better fuel economy and a smoother driving experience than a traditional automatic transmission. CVTs have been used in passenger cars since 1989, but if you haven’t been car shopping in several years, a CVT may be new to you. If you've been shopping for a new car recently, you've undoubtedly found that large numbers of late-model vehicles are equipped with a continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT). A continuously variable transmission (CVT) is a type of transmission that can provide an unlimited range of gear ratios in automobiles.